Home/Tag: LGBTQ Genealogy

#LGBTQgenealogy: A History

By |2020-12-15T15:35:56-08:00December 15th, 2020|

At the 2017 FGS Conference, I was inspired by Judy Russell and her presentation entitled “Rainbows and Kaleidoscopes: Inclusion as a Society and Corporate Genealogical Standard.” Judy, The Legal Genealogist, a well-respected professional holding significant community status, was telling her own industry to become more inclusive of diversity.  All our […]

LGBTQ Genealogy – Part 20

By |2020-12-14T21:34:04-08:00October 15th, 2020|

Putting it all together

Throughout this blog series, I’ve written about finding clues in the genealogical record that might raise a rainbow flag.  Remember the confirmed bachelor or spinster aunt was not by default unlucky in finding a spouse. Perhaps they did have long-term partners but there was no legal record […]

LGBTQ Genealogy – Part 17

By |2020-06-24T05:12:20-07:00June 15th, 2020|

From Domestic Partnership to Marriage

In August 1979, gay rights activist Tom Brougham proposed a new category of relationship called “domestic partnership” to address the inequality of job benefits only extending to heterosexually married couples.  Tom and a group of dedicated LGBTQ activists, which included my husband Leland Traiman, brought the […]

LGBTQ Genealogy – Part 16

By |2020-06-16T06:05:15-07:00April 15th, 2020|

Gay Professions

There is a reason for the stereotype of the gay hairdresser. Not only is it a profession some men gravitate towards, but it is also practical for survival. Homosexuals that are discovered risk losing their employment or being blackballed from their professions.  This is still true today in parts […]

LGBTQ Genealogy – Part 15

By |2020-02-04T22:07:38-08:00March 15th, 2020|

Gayborhoods

The first gay pride marches happened in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Chicago in 1970, one year after the Stonewall Riots. Why in those cities? Because they had the largest LGBTQ populations at the time. Military Blue and Dishonorable discharges created concentrations of queer folk in these major […]

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